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Students compete in Wisconsin State KidWind Challenge

Saturday 07, March 2020

Eighteen schools from eight school districts participated, with students ranging from fifth to 12th grade. Participants strived to make the most efficient, small-scale wind turbine or solar structure.

MADISON, WI, (March 7, 2020) – Middle and high school students from across Wisconsin gathered at the Wisconsin Energy Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to compete in the Wisconsin State KidWind Challenge on Saturday, March 7, 2020. University of Wisconsin-Madison students and community members helped coordinate the event, while EDP Renewables North America, Alliant Energy, and MG&E Foundation sponsored the competition. KidWind is an organization focused on helping educators and students learn about renewable energy.

Eighteen schools from eight school districts participated, with students ranging from fifth to 12th grade. Participants strived to make the most efficient, small-scale wind turbine or solar structure. The fun also extended beyond the competitors, as spectators had the opportunity to create blades for a model wind turbine that were tested for efficiency in a wind tunnel.

“Middle and high school students who have participated in a KidWind Challenge know more about the design and building of a wind turbine than most people,” said Dick Anderson, KidWind Advisor. “The hands-on process takes theory and puts it to the test.”

The Wisconsin Challenge gave students a fun environment to learn how energy is harnessed in wind turbines and solar structures. Four teams were named winners: The Gusty Goons from Darlington High School, HAWT-ies from Darlington High School, The Quilt Blockers from Darlington High School and Mauston Juniors from Mauston High School. With the help of national sponsors like EDP Renewables North America, KidWind will also be able to host more events across the U.S.

EDP Renewables North America currently operates the 98 megawatt (MW) Quilt Block Wind Farm near Madison and is looking to expand its operations in the state. “Students and parents see these 49 wind turbines every day,” Anderson explained. “Everyone uses electricity, and the more everyone knows about it, the better.”

Kid Wind Challenge